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SOTG 412 - Trauma is the Number 1 killed of Americans Under Age 46

SOTG 412 – Trauma is the Number 1 killed of Americans Under Age 46

Though it comes a no surprise to those of us a SOTG University, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) have issued a new report with recommendations about using the lessons from the battlefield and applying them to stateside trauma care.

During our SWAT Fuel Fitness Talk, Jarrad and Paul discuss the value of taking breaks in your routine and just how long they should be.

And, the Professor shares with you yet another reason why “Adult Probation” is terrible joke upon the good people of America.

Topics Covered During This Episode:

  • SWAT Fuel Fitness Talk: Set a time limit for your break during workouts
  • Adult Probation is a Joke: Man commits murder after removing prosthetic leg with ankle GPS
  • Personal Story: USS Forrestal Steel father’s day gift
  • Trauma is the #1 Cause of Death for Americans under the age of 46
  • Stop the Bleed program

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From www.fox5dc.com:

A review is underway at the District’s Pre-Trial Services agency after a GPS monitoring device was incorrectly placed on a man’s prosthetic leg.

That man, 34-year-old Quincy Green, took off his leg and committed a murder.

Dana Hamilton was shot to death on Southern Avenue last month and police had no suspects for six days until someone dropped a dime on Green. He was fitted with the GPS device after he had been arrested for carrying a pistol without a license.

After receiving the tip on Green, police checked camera footage from the surrounding area and according to a nine page affidavit the gunman was spotted, with an obvious limp.

Authorities filed a search warrant and inside Green’s residence officials recovered a box from the living room, inside the box was a prosthetic leg with a GPS tracking device. A device record showed that it had barely moved in a 72 hour period.

“Very simply it was human error,” said Cliff Keenan, the Director of the Pre-trial Services Agency for the District of Columbia.

This agency monitors defendants facing charges in court.

“The contract through which we have contracted for services includes putting onto the individual defendants the actual GPS bracelet and one would assume that the person doing the installation would know not to put it on to a prosthetic device, we don’t know what the company has been able to find out about how this happened under these particular circumstances other than it was a violation of protocols,” said Keenan.

The district did away with cash bond years ago and instead defendants are released on their own recognizance or fitted with one of the GPS tracking devices from Sentinel Services of California.

“With this company over the last three years we have had nearly five thousand placements of GPS devices on individuals,” said Keenan. “As of today we have about 480 people in the community with a GPS device this is the first time the company or I have heard of this incident or this kind of incident happening”.

An incident that’s also angered the DC Police union.

“From what I understand the device has to be put skin to device and they sent somebody out to put this device on and it’s not touching its skin,” said Russell Mullins, Jr., Executive Steward, DC Police Union. “I guess our biggest concern is we are out there every day putting our life on the line for citizens and making sure they are safe and then someone turns around and does something like this that lets them back out.”

The court affidavit says that in the days leading up to the killing, Green, was seen several times near the intersection of Chesapeake and Southern. The exact location he was told to stay away from, indicating the GPS device he was supposed to be wearing was somewhere else.

The motive for the murder is still unclear.

From www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com:

The leading cause of death for Americans under the age of 46 is trauma — a disabling or life-threatening physical injury that results from an event such as a motor vehicle crash, gun violence, or fall. In 2013, trauma cost approximately $670 billion in medical care expenses and lost productivity. Of the 147,790 U.S. trauma deaths in 2014, as many as 20 percent — or about 30,000 — may have been preventable after injury with optimal trauma care. Mass casualty incidents and increasing foreign and domestic threats to homeland security lend urgency to the translation of wartime lessons to civilian trauma systems, says a new report.

Across the current military and civilian trauma care systems, the quality of trauma care varies greatly depending on when and where an individual is injured, placing lives unnecessarily at risk, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS). Mass casualty incidents and increasing foreign and domestic threats to homeland security lend urgency to the translation of wartime lessons to civilian trauma systems, said the committee that carried out the study and wrote the report.

The NAS says that the White House should lead the integration of military and civilian trauma care to establish a national trauma care system and set an aim to achieve zero preventable deaths after injury. In addition, Congress, in consultation with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, should help ensure that prehospital care, such as emergency medical services, are included as a seamless component of health care delivery, rather than being viewed and paid as merely transportation providers.

The leading cause of death for Americans under the age of 46 is trauma — a disabling or life-threatening physical injury that results from an event such as a motor vehicle crash, gun violence, or fall. In 2013, trauma cost approximately $670 billion in medical care expenses and lost productivity.

Recognizing that the best strategy to reduce the considerable burden associated with trauma is to prevent injuries from occurring in the first place, the delivery of optimal trauma care when injuries do occur is a critical means of preventing unnecessary death and disability. Of the 147,790 U.S. trauma deaths in 2014, as many as 20 percent — or about 30,000 — may have been preventable after injury with optimal trauma care, the committee said.

Significant advances in trauma care have developed over the last decade in response to the large number of U.S. casualties during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The percentage of wounded service members who died of their injuries in Afghanistan decreased by nearly 50 percent between 2005 and 2013.

Those successes are to be heralded but need to be improved upon and sustained, the committee said. Nearly 1,000 service members who lost their lives on the battlefield between 2001 and 2011 died of potentially survivable injuries.

From www.studentofthegun.com:

A young Philadelphia, Pennsylvania police officer will live to return to duty after being shot through the upper thigh by a thug trying to steal a car. While attempting to apprehend two car thieves, Officer James McCullough was shot by a suspect. Recognizing the life-threatening injury, Officer McCullough applied a tourniquet to his own leg and arrived alive at the Emergency Room. At press time he is expected to make a full recovery.

This is not the first time an American law enforcement officer has used a tourniquet to save a life after being shot by a thug. A Boston police officer saved his partner’s life by applying a commercially made tourniquet. Boston started issuing TQ’s to road officers after the Islamic Terror Attack on the Boston Marathon.

Mississippi Governor, Phil Bryant, recently endorsed traumatic life-saving training and tourniquet use after a Mississippi law enforcement officer’s life was saved by those very things. Even the Department of Homeland Security is promoting tourniquet use via a program they are calling “Stop the Bleed.” Though, in typical government fashion, their recommended procedures are ten years behind the times. At least they have good intentions.

Tourniquet Boogeyman

Despite more than a dozen years of successful use during the Global War on Terror, a U.S. Army study that fully and completely endorses rapid applications of tourniquets in the field, and mounting evidence from the American streets, there are still those who are afraid of the dreaded tourniquet.

Those who fear the tourniquet or believe that it should only be considered for use by “the professionals” fail to understand two basic concepts:

1) Good guys can and do bleed to death, and not just from gunshots. High speed vehicle collisions often result in severe trauma, to include partial and complete amputation of limbs. Shattered bones in the arms and legs can and will tear open arteries.

2) If a person has a compromised artery in a limb, only the people on the scene will have the ability to stop the traumatic bleeding injury and prevent the victim from going into irreversible shock. An uncontrolled arterial bleed will cause a patient to lose enough blood to achieve irreversible shock, in minutes, not ten to twenty, but four to five.

If an ambulance arrives in five minutes, and that is fast, the patient with an open artery will already have lost enough blood that no amount of medical treatment can save their life. Holding their hand and telling them the medics are coming will not save their life.

(Read the Full Article Here!)

From www.dhs.gov:

No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the blood loss.

“Stop the Bleed” is a nationwide campaign to empower individuals to act quickly and save lives.

Remember to be aware of your surroundings and move yourself and the injured person to safety, if necessary.

Call 911.

Bystanders can take simple steps to keep the injured person alive until appropriate medical care is available. Here are three actions you can take to help save a life:

Find where the bleeding is coming from and apply firm, steady pressure to the bleeding site with bandages or clothing

If the bleeding doesn’t stop, place a tourniquet 2-3 inches closer to the torso from the bleeding. (The tourniquet may be applied and secured over clothing.)
Pull the strap through the buckle, twist the rod tightly, clip and secure the rod with the clasp or the Velcro strap.

If the bleeding still doesn’t stop, place a second tourniquet closer to the torso from the first tourniquet.
Pull the strap through the buckle, twist the rod tightly, clip and secure the rod with the clasp or the Velcro strap.

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Paul G. Markel has worn many hats during his lifetime. He has been a U.S. Marine, Police Officer, Professional Bodyguard, and Small Arms and Tactics Instructor. Mr. Markel has been writing professionally for law enforcement and firearms periodicals for nearly twenty years with hundreds and hundreds of articles in print. Paul is a regular guest on nationally syndicated radio talk shows and subject matter expert in firearms training and use of force. Mr. Markel has been teaching safe and effective firearms handling to students young and old for decades and has worked actively with the 4-H Shooting Sports program. Paul holds numerous instructor certifications in multiple disciplines and a Bachelor’s degree in conflict resolution; nonetheless, he is and will remain a dedicated Student of the Gun.

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